Author Topic: How to tell if I'm an Artisan?  (Read 8249 times)

Doris

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How to tell if I'm an Artisan?
« on: April 11, 2011, 08:44:47 AM »
I read the articles about the roles and I think I'm an artisan. Are there any other tell signs?

Doris

John Roth

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Re: How to tell if I'm an Artisan?
« Reply #1 on: April 13, 2011, 04:44:14 AM »
You need to get it channeled to be sure.

Artisans are ordinal expressive. What that means is that the "typical" artisan will frequently be involved in something creative, either by herself (crafts, writing, etc.) or with a small number of people. The energy flows from inside out, and the expression tends to be with things rather than people (the latter is the Sage.) Many artisans express their creativity with everything they touch.

One way we used to distinguish artisans from servers was that artisans tended to run out of closets for their clothes, while servers don't care. Of course, that's totally surfacy, but it's still surprising how often it's true.

HTH

John Roth

KarenH

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Re: How to tell if I'm an Artisan?
« Reply #2 on: April 16, 2011, 06:59:46 AM »
Gadgets.  We like gadgets.  Not just to have but to make lots of things with them.

My kitchen utensil drawer is full of kitchen gadgets.  For example, I have two different things that deal with garlic:  a garlic press and a garlic slicer.  I have two kinds of cheese graters.  I also picked up a cool nutmeg grater in the Netherlands that looks like a little doll, as well as a nifty silicone combination hot pepper crusher and dispenser that looks like a cute little chili pepper.  Also, I love kitchen appliances, although I've been careful not to get too many of them.  But hey, I do have a Kitchenaid mixer with all the different attachments (including pasta maker), crockpots (one large, one small, and one old in which I dye wool for spinning yarn), as well as a food processor, and a few other things.

I had a marvelous time today using my food processor and crockpot to experiment with a chicken chili recipe I haven't tried before.  Decided to puree dry roasted peanuts as well as cilantro and put that in as well.  Don't know what possessed me to put in the peanuts, but dang, I'm glad I did!  Gave it just the right earthiness to underscore the spice without overwhelming the chicken.

Also Artisans collect software if we're into computers at all.  For a long time, I downloaded a number of shareware and freeware graphics and web creation software to try them out before finding a bargain on the Adobe Creative Suite.  I think I have three different word processing/office suite programs (Microsoft, Apple, and Open Office), as well as two or three story-tracker/plotting software programs.  Maybe more.  

And then there are the hobbies.  I focus mostly on knitting and spinning yarn now, but in the past I've done watercolor painting, decoupage, macrame, photography (still do that, actually), silk flower making, making stuff with Sculpy, pottery, making cards using rubber stamps, and now I'm seriously thinking about designing fabric patterns.  But first, I think I'll take some classes and learn how to thoroughly exploit the capabilities of the Adobe Creative Suite software....

You see what I mean?    :D

Of course, some of that may arise from my goal of growth, but the general theme here is using all these tools to make or create something.  We're also good at making something out of raw materials, used materials, trash, and sometimes nothing at all.  The other day, I was cleaning my office and discovered an old 3.5" computer diskette carrying case, and realized it would be absolutely perfect to organize my circular knitting needles.  I think anyone else might have thrown it out, but now I have a nifty knitting needle and accessory case I can easily slip into my purse.

One of the best presents my husband ever gave me for Christmas was an iPad, yet another gadget.  I can now indulge in all my hobbies (yes, there are knitting apps) anywhere I go, as well as my main creative work, writing.  I can even finger paint with a nifty app I just downloaded last week.

On the negative side, artisans are also very good at making mountains out of molehills.    :P  I try not to dwell on that....

--Karen H.
« Last Edit: April 16, 2011, 07:13:39 AM by KarenH »

Chiara DB

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Re: How to tell if I'm an Artisan?
« Reply #3 on: April 17, 2011, 06:22:45 AM »
For me one of the telltale signs of an artisan is an intense interest in making stuff with their hands. Just look at Karen's post! A lot of people have crafty hobbies, but an artisan will be highly engaged and almost endlessly fascinated by different forms of hands-on creation activities.

I also note a kind of otherworldly/distracted look in the eyes and in their energy, almost like they're watching/perceiving a movie that no one else can see, and it's giving them LOTS of ideas for their next project.... :D And, lots of time, they're very attractive and cute :)

Dave

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Re: How to tell if I'm an Artisan?
« Reply #4 on: April 17, 2011, 07:29:22 AM »
And, lots of time, they're very attractive and cute :)

Sadly that wasn't on the list of ingredients when they made this artisan. I was born a big lumpy pillow with the stuffing all pushed to one side. But in my next lifetime I intend to be the next Brad Pitt, so look out!   ;D

Perhaps more succinctly: Artisans are crafty.

Best,
Dave

KarenH

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Re: How to tell if I'm an Artisan?
« Reply #5 on: April 17, 2011, 03:58:48 PM »
You sound so cuddly, Dave. I think cuddly comes under the heading of "cute."

Chiara DB

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Re: How to tell if I'm an Artisan?
« Reply #6 on: April 17, 2011, 06:52:13 PM »
Dave, whatever you didn't get in cuteness, you got in sense of humor, which we know is almost the same thing ("Why did you fall in love with him?" "He made me laugh!")!

jk

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Re: How to tell if I'm an Artisan?
« Reply #7 on: April 17, 2011, 09:43:11 PM »
I would say that Artisan will be manually gifted, possibly artistic. They may be into science, or at least asking "how are things made?". It is also important to consider casting. Far more often people come across as the Role of their casting than their Essence role. Are they making stuff with their hands? Definitely yes? Then they are very probably Artisans. But even this apparently may have exceptions - i.e. one can be an Artisan and for some reason not create.

Velleity

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Re: How to tell if I'm an Artisan?
« Reply #8 on: April 18, 2011, 08:45:48 AM »
I think my boyfriend's probably an artisan (or has a big artisan component), and it really gets through to me as 'seeing patterns', wondering how things fit together, and usually being adept at seeing that picture of the world. For example, he's a bicycle courier, which I find amazing, that he can be aware of so much going on at one time, his jobs to do, how many he can pick up and bring from one side of town to the other, where and which order to drop them off in, while weaving in and out of traffic and managing not to get hit by cars. That's probably his 5 inputs at work. But it's still all a puzzle to be pieced together from multiple parts.

He also really enjoys cooking and figuring out what ingredients go together well, having a real interest in recipes and then not always following them.

I also asked him once what he generally thinks about during the day, and he said that he goes around mostly wondering how things are made... buildings, devices, structures, bikes, space, anything. Oh and he's quite into his bike and is constantly putting different/new parts on it at a bike shop downtown. He majored in photography in university, built his own computer from parts, 'knows' computers' structures, is interested in things like sacred geometry, politics, and yep, is 'crafty' (figuring out ways to beat the system) and pretty handy. He also worked in a butchery, and at an insurance firm inputting data and designing/organizing a system to hold all the information. Not very showy, but is a bit rough around the edges. One of those rugged silent artisans who's into his 'craft'. 

I have a discarnate artisan ET, but it tends to manifest more in me having too many clothes and being generally creative. (well, and much more, like adding beetroot to a stirfry and making it all pink...).

But I'm still pretty amazed at how geared-toward and conscious he is of 'systems'. Pretty evident. When I was having a hard time 'following the rules' of art school (which is where we met) he said I just had to play the system enough until I was done, and I realized how not good I am at doing that (in comparison).
« Last Edit: April 18, 2011, 08:54:03 AM by Elisabeth »

KarenH

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Re: How to tell if I'm an Artisan?
« Reply #9 on: April 18, 2011, 09:22:27 PM »
He also really enjoys cooking and figuring out what ingredients go together well, having a real interest in recipes and then not always following them.

Bingo. I collect recipes, but once I got the system down for a particular type of food, the recipes became guidelines.  I almost never follow one to the letter, unless I find that I don't have a technique down pat yet.  I find this is typical of identified artisans I know.

Quote
I also asked him once what he generally thinks about during the day, and he said that he goes around mostly wondering how things are made... buildings, devices, structures, bikes, space, anything. Oh and he's quite into his bike and is constantly putting different/new parts on it at a bike shop downtown. He majored in photography in university, built his own computer from parts, 'knows' computers' structures, is interested in things like sacred geometry, politics, and yep, is 'crafty' (figuring out ways to beat the system) and pretty handy. He also worked in a butchery, and at an insurance firm inputting data and designing/organizing a system to hold all the information. Not very showy, but is a bit rough around the edges. One of those rugged silent artisans who's into his 'craft'. 

But I'm still pretty amazed at how geared-toward and conscious he is of 'systems'. Pretty evident. When I was having a hard time 'following the rules' of art school (which is where we met) he said I just had to play the system enough until I was done, and I realized how not good I am at doing that (in comparison).

Systems, exactly.  Structure.  I'm always wondering how things work. 

I looked at the coding for quoting in replies here in this forum and figured out it was some kind of modified HTML code.  So I decided to try it out, and voila!  I now have control over at least one aspect of quoting on this forum.  I don't know why, but doing stuff like that tickles me pink.  Possibly because I'm an artisan.   :D

So, what if I decided to manually bold or italicize something?  Cool!  Same process, except with square brackets!

What?  Use the buttons at the top of the editing window?  Where's the fun in that?

--Karen H.

jk

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Re: How to tell if I'm an Artisan?
« Reply #10 on: May 29, 2011, 11:53:16 PM »
Quote
He also really enjoys cooking and figuring out what ingredients go together well, having a real interest in recipes and then not always following them.
That's exactly what I do.

He does sound like an Artisan, Elisabeth. Could you please elaborate on what are the rules of art school? I have never been to one. I wonder, as Artisans and Sages tend to have problems with rules, well at least I do and couple of other people I spoke to, and this is supposed to be easier for Kings and Warriors.

Velleity

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Re: How to tell if I'm an Artisan?
« Reply #11 on: May 30, 2011, 05:43:13 AM »
The rules of Art School. Hmm.

From my experience (in two schools), there was a lot of emphasis on social obligations, extroversion, being part of an art community, helping out with things not related to you and your work. And especially with printmaking... well printmakers are a certain kind of breed with a 'guild' mentality. Undergraduates feel obligated ("are expected") to help graduates with projects, graduates help teachers with their projects. Being a king the hierarchy didn't vibe well with me. lol. Which is amusing in retrospect, but I'm not very good at groveling and being in 'awe' of higher ups.

Basically you can't really go to art school and expect to "just make art", unless you want to be seen as a hermit who's not going to make it in the art world. I don't necessarily want to make it in the art world, that's not what I went to art school for, so all the extra networking and social requirements just gave me a huge headache and depressed me. And there didn't seem to be an 'opt out' button. It was looked down upon if you didn't participate. Like extra-curriculars in high school. There are some students who love them, and some who just do not do them. People who do extra-curriculars often don't understand the ones who don't.

I had problems pretending to go along with the system. Maybe artisans are better at faking that they're working or following rules (even if they really aren't). My bf usually did "just enough" to satisfy the instructors then disappeared. And so they usually left him alone. Whereas I felt more rebellious and stubborn in wanting to do things "My Way", and was a bit more in the spotlight of going against the current, even if quietly. Bucking the system entirely, accidentally, rather than playing it to my own advantage. I'm horrible at politics. And I'm too honest and above board when asked "why" about things.

I don't know, for me I'm also just used to having my own agenda and being left alone until I have to hand stuff in. Am used to people trusting that I'll get things accomplished in my own way. Basically I like doing what I want and will finish on the deadline, but I don't like people telling me how to do it, or requiring me do other miscellaneous tasks which in my mind don't "fit" into what I'm doing. I get so focused on a project that when I have to do something, say, help install an installation or do gallery things that I don't have energy for... it just throws me off. If it's part of what I'm doing, then fine.

Not that art people really told me how I must do things, but I guess I'm fond of getting the basic guidelines then being set free. I'm sure artisans and sages are like that as well, and I do know that quite a few other people in my classes struggled with similar things and "how much work is enough work? what am I being judged on exactly? Why does this other person get A's by just doing the paperwork while I get C's and do better art but hate workbooks?". Quite a few friends I made had such great art pieces that the do-gooders didn't understand, and then my friends got C's or barely passed classes because they didn't do all of what was required, or something else dumb. So then we all feel like failures. Makes me angry. My sage sister (who's studying jazz singing) said she doesn't understand how I could survive art school with putting so MUCH of my self and emotions ideas into HUGE long term projects that were graded/judged by others who weren't inclined to really understand me at all (and well, I nearly didn't survive).

Mature King, goes into art school, learns the hard way of what is expected... finds it 'not in line' with her values, then wants to change the system and is angry that people won't allow her to do certain things in a more manageable (for her) way. I still have a lot of angst about it that I'm having to work on.

I don't really understand how one can really get a degree in 'art'... it feels really anathema to the whole creative process. Doesn't treat it very gently, and is geared more toward the art world and art 'business'. Art school is not for artists anymore.
« Last Edit: May 30, 2011, 05:50:48 AM by Elisabeth »

jk

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Re: How to tell if I'm an Artisan?
« Reply #12 on: May 30, 2011, 01:40:57 PM »
Oh I would have had a problem with the same things you do, Elisabeth. Can't stand politics and grovelling and I like to be left alone when I feel like it and when I am focused on a project.
I like to help people and get involved, but I no longer do it when I don't have it in me, or at least try not to.

Velleity

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Re: How to tell if I'm an Artisan?
« Reply #13 on: May 30, 2011, 09:29:13 PM »
Yeah, I do wonder what the general make-up of art schools is, Michael Teachings wise? Or it might be a soul-age thing... ?  As I got the impression that others didn't think the system was that weird or hard to deal with. Hmm. I really liked art school my first year when I wasn't required to participate in extra curriculars. It was great! Because I was creating art and was allowed to explore. But then things got too serious and I was going to be 'made' to apply to art residencies and grad schools where I was, even though I knew I was going to move out of the country... I'm sure some people can let others' expectations roll off their backs, or not worry as much about it.

Another thing I think is that there was a mis-timing of being expected to have definite personal themes and ideas all ready to be put into artwork, when I was still exploring my self and my artistic voice/soul. Some people already had stuff to say. But I got really lost and felt like things were being yanked out of me before they were ready... (like tearing into a flower bud).

Anyway. I'm glad I went, and I learned an awful awful lot... but I wouldn't go back. heh.

Betty

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Re: How to tell if I'm an Artisan?
« Reply #14 on: May 31, 2011, 12:01:48 AM »
As a definite non-Artisan, I hated art classes.   ;)